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Stowe Story Labs exists to help emerging screenwriters, filmmakers and creative producers get work made and seen.

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Stowe Story Labs Announces 2015 PAGE International Fellowship Finalists

shan palmer

Stowe Story Labs is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2015 PAGE International Screenwriting Awards / Stowe Story Labs Fellowships to the Labs.

The non-profit Stowe Story Labs run from September 12 – 15 at the Helen Day Art Center in Stowe, Vermont and bring emerging screenwriters, filmmakers and creative producers from around the world together with top industry mentors with the aim of getting good work made and seen.

PAGE is a long-running and leading international screenwriting competition dedicated to advancing the craft of writing and the careers of skilled and talented writers.

PAGE has partnered with Stowe Story Labs since 2013 to provide fellowships to the Labs. This year the partnership is providing two fellowships to the Labs.

The 2015 PAGE Fellowship finalists are:

Kate Bernstein for her historical drama ELEANOR, about Eleanor Roosevelt’s profound influence her husband’s Presidency.

Lisa Cole for her compelling drama SUE, based on the true story of a  detective’s quest to save children caught up in America’s drug crisis.

Michael Curtis for his chilling drama INHERITANCE. When Brandon learns of his dead father’s role in a racially-charged murder, this well-intentioned man risks everything to make things right with the victim’s family.

Jennifer Dunbar for her character-based dramatic comedy THE RUBBER ROOM, about Sarah, a middle-aged housewife trying to reinvent herself as an English teacher, who falls into an affair with Ben the bohemian musician.

Alex Lyras for the historical drama THE EPICURIAN, about the true story of Eda Saccone, who faced every possible obstacle before establishing the first ever official culinary society for women in 1959, Les Dames d’Escoffier.

Katherine Parsons for her family fantasy script A BEAUTIFUL FISH, about a young girl forced to unlock her Maine island’s deep magic to rescue her mother from a vicious sorcerer. Her only allies are a bully, an ancient French-speaking cat, and an elusive mermaid.

Olga Rojer for her bio pic PARADISE CLUB, about Arthur Braggs, an African-American nightclub owner and music-business entrepreneur who took on the world to bring Africa-American talent to a racially charged America.

Harry Roth for his comedy DAD’S ASHES. Estranged brothers are forced to take their father’s ashes and scatter them atop a Scottish mountain.

Nandita Seshadri for her sci-fi action film TO CAST A SHADOW, about a “High Functioning Android” run amuck, killing off her creators, forcing ex-FBI agent Lucia Salazar to team up with a more recent model to find and shut down the malfunctioning monster.

Vanita Shastry for her psychological drama SEPTEMBER SKY, about a young woman who physically escaped the 9/11 attacks unharmed but remains haunted by a coworker who perished.

Leia Vogelle for her action adventure script FULL MOON RISING. Cornish fisher-girl Tamara is forced to smuggle to save her jailed father and is betrayed by her employer. Tamara must then outwit the Customs Men, the brutal Royal Navy and violent storms at sea to free her father before he’s hanged.

Nancy Zafris for her historical drama THE COLORED WOMAN’S CHAPTER, set in 1939 and about a shy maid who leads her colored women’s social group in their effort to bring the celebrated singer Marian Anderson to their Ohio hamlet after hearing her famous concert at the Lincoln Memorial.

“I am thrilled to have learned a bit about these writers and their stories,” said David Rocchio, founder and director of Stowe Story Labs, “and I want to thank the reviewers for their hard, hard work and PAGE for this tremendous partnership. I wish we could offer fellowships to each one of these talented writers and do not welcome the culling required to pick two from the twelve.”